Patron-Age: Time with Two Ladies – Myassari and Urhatta

August 31, 2015 Leave a comment

MyassariI have said this before and will no doubt say this again: but one of the very best things about the Dungeon Crawl Classics community, something I see in absolutely no other game system, is the creativity of the fans and player base. As a whole and as individuals, the members of the community have created some amazing add-ons to the basic game.

One of my few issues with the DCC Core Rulebook is that the patrons section is very light. There’s full write-ups for three patrons, a few that are a little more fleshed out and some only have very basic information. This was a great opportunity for the community to step up and pitch in with some additional patrons to fill any perceived voids in your games.

Two of my favorites are Myassari, The Patron of Birth and Decay and Urhatta the Worldwalker.

Myassari is a harpy-countenanced being with a penchant for the passage of time and the secrets of the flame. One of the best spells I’ve seen is a patron spell from Myassari called “Healing Womb” — with a high enough roll, your target can be enveloped in a “fleshy amniotic sack” in which your targets can be healed… with some side effects, of course. Who wouldn’t want that? Written by Clinty Bohaty and Julian Bernick with art by Trevor Hartman from Order of the Quill, the PDF is available for download at RPG Now.

Urhatta was written by Eric Hoffman at Stormlord Publishing, and is currently available as a free download direct from their site. A “time-traveling, space-warping, energy breathing patron” — Urhatta is described as an ancient and powerful djinn who exists in several dimensions and timelines simultaneously. All of the patron spells are great, but the Invoke Patron results are really spectacular. I would have loved some artwork to go along with the great patron write-up. Maybe we could get that an option in a future Kickstarter?

Both of these patrons have concerns with time and with space and with energy… but they couldn’t be more different. While both would fit in any DCC (or MCC?) scenario or campaign: I can definitely see Urhatta striding the space lanes as the patron of a futuristic broken world crawler or of mutated wizard-warrior in a forgotten city, whereas I see Myassari more as the secret patron of an old blind witch deep in the Shudder Mountains or of a trio of flame-haired hags.

Check them both out for yourself and let us know in the comments what you think. Have some more patrons we haven’t seen yet? Let us know that as well. I have plenty of space left in my Zine Vaults!

Categories: Books, DCCRPG, Reviews, Zines

Star Wars: Edge of the Empire – Build your Bounty Hunter Guild Office

August 23, 2015 Leave a comment

marshallThe guys at the always entertaining Order 66 podcast reminded me of one of my favorite elements of the Far Horizons colonist sourcebook in their most recent episode which talks about taking a homestead or a business as a party asset during character creation. We are going to use that as a basis for my ongoing concept for a bounty hunter campaign. There are different upgrades and benefits for running a homestead as compared to a business. While it might be awesome to have a dedicated space station for a guild office (especially with the infirmary, landing bay and mechanic’s garage upgrades), it seems to make more thematic sense to run a guild office as a business. As a business, you can acquire a specialized license (bounty hunting!) that can allow the party access to restricted items (weapons, vehicles, gear).

This provides the party a home base, and possibly a place to rest and recover. Beyond that, as one of the mechanics for taking the homestead/business, there is one NPC per PC to represent the staff that takes care of day-to-day operations while the party is out gallivanting across the universe. This is not only convenient to keep the lights on, these NPCs can become beloved friends of the party and may turn into adventure seeds if they get in to trouble. It could also provide a possible stable of replacement PCs, should something go terribly wrong on an adventure. A nice ancillary benefit of taking this as a starting asset is that all PCs start with a skill associated with the business as a career skill. The Order 66 team suggest not allowing this to be a combat skill, as that would be slightly out of balance, and I agree. For a Bounty Hunter Guild office, I would suggest Knowledge (Underworld), Perception, or Vigilance.

Having a home office makes sense for low-level bounty hunters, as they would start out with easier, more regional bounties before working up to larger, further reaching and higher-profile jobs. Having the PCs based out of a regional office could also mean higher profile hunters stop in from time to time to gather supplies, intel, and maybe trade a few stories and tips.

SWE10-table

For running a casual weekly campaign at a Friendly Local Gaming Store with players dropping in and dropping out now and again, the base can be assumed to be the party asset during character creation. Since there should be an NPC droid or employee per party member, I would encourage each PC to come up with their NPC counterpart. They could be old friends, or have no relationship between them whatsoever, but it takes some of the NPC burden off the GM. Not only that, but whoever shows up for the mission, dictates the cast of NPCs that show up for work that day. Ideally, the NPCs would serve some basic function and have a defining quirk. Possible ideas include a custodial droid that aspires to hunt himself, and trips over itself trying to impress the hunters. Another could be a grumpy Gran operations manager that constantly complains about the quality of hunters these days. There could be an attractive receptionist that always plays it cool around the hunters like Ms. Moneypenny from the Bond movies. Also specifically for a guild office, there could be a meticulous quartermaster in charge of renting specialty equipment for certain missions. The possibilities are endless.

casinoHaving the guild office be a business rather than a homestead would mean the hunters would need services and develop relationships with others in the community/settlement/city. They would likely have to work with a space dockmaster, trade for supplies with merchants, and blow off some steam at a casino or cantina. Building your own sandbox can be challenging, but very rewarding in that the PCs will feel empowered to blaze their own trail. A bounty hunter campaign could become stale if it was an endless string of jobs assigned by the guild. Creating a rich ecosystem allows for adventure seeds to develop outside the acquisitions from the office.

Once the PCs are established, they have the option of starting another office on another planet, or starting one as a homestead (likely spacestation). This would allow them a base that includes an infirmary, landing pad, and mechanics garage if the party pays for the upgrades or takes on the additional obligation. Unlike typical obligation, this would apply to the entire party rather than a single PC. If this obligation is rolled, it could mean maintenance issues or slow business, or something much more serious like a trusted NPC staff member in trouble.

I really like this mechanic as a basis for a more detailed bounty hunter campaign, that could serve as a great pick-up game to play in public. In the next installment I’ll detail some example guild missions, and maybe one or two NPC missions that can come from having the PCs operate out of a home base.

Occult Adventures – Year of the Serpent Characters

August 11, 2015 Comments off

In honor of the Pathfinder Society Organized Play’s new Year of the Serpent season and the Occult Adventures sourcebook (READ OUR REVIEW!), here are some snake-themed characters ready to download and play. Yes, Year of the Serpent refers to the Aspis Consortium, but would it not be interesting to showcase a race that does not get as much publicity as others and in a different way? All of these characters are nagaji and of a class from Occult Adventures with one archetype each. They may not be overly optimized, but they’ll be fun to play! Enjoy!

Here they are:

  • Ganjas Wataris – Hydrokineticist (Overwhelming Soul): Claiming the direct lineage of a water naga, she commands water as easily as other creatures breathe.
  • Kasile Ecdyss – Medium (Reanimated Medium): As a murdered ex-gladiator, he struggles to keep his (almost) lost spirit in check.
  • Cawbra – Mesmerist (Vexing Daredevil): Whether or not in battle, the sly and hypnotic Cawbra uses his snake-charming abilities less worthy creatures.
  • Spragor Greysnake – Occultist (Battle Host): Bonded with the ancient samurai armor of a great warrior, he feels compelled to continue in the footsteps of its previous owner.
  • Maraguar the Mutate – Psychic (Mutation Mind): After experimenting with chemicals infused with naga scales, he finds his mind and body reacting unpredictably to the aberrant psychic energies coursing through his blood.
  • Sakara – Spiritualist (Fractured Mind): Dedicated to his people, Sakora’s psyche seems to have split into two, constantly competing with itself to reach new heights and do the right thing.
Categories: Uncategorized

Occult Adventures Review

August 10, 2015 1 comment

In October and November of 2014, Paizo conducted a playtest of six new classes all themed of the occult. During the playtest, players were encouraged to test and report all of the things they encountered and ways to help the classes improve. The playtest was then closed and players started the speculation about how the final product would turn out.

Fast forward to the release of Occult Adventures at GenCon 2015. People are estactic. The book is beautiful and fully loaded with everything needed to introduce the psychic and occult into players’ campaigns. Between the new classes, their archetypes, archetypes for existing classes, feats, equipment and psychic magic, this book has it all. All of this is new and it does not feel like a rehash or reskinning of established material. Combined with Pathfinder Unchained released a few months ago, Paizo is hitting on all cylinders and is putting out some quality books.

Let’s get down to the nitty gritty and look at what is really important – the classes. We will take a look at what we saw in the playtest, what was changed and what we can expect from these classes in players’ hands. This may be a long article this week, but there are some interesting tidbits in there (and, of course, characters at the end).

Kineticist – Playtest Review

Quick Description: “With a connection to the elements, a kineticist can bring forth energy in the form of kinetic blasts. Instead of casting psychic spells, the kineticist uses unique psychic spell-like abilities called wild talents to manipulate elemental energy and matter.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: This class got the most attention out of all the occult classes. The appeal and nuances of this type of genre is popular and will drive this class for quite some time. Being able to understand, use and apply ‘burn’ will be one of the challenges of this class as will the amount of material this class encompasses. There are 20 pages devoted to this class (24 if you count the archetypes) and there is simply a lot to cull through to get what you want. Understanding the different types of blasts and how they are delivered remain the same with an added bonus of full damage to swarms creeping in there. This class looks like a lot of fun and with the right group, you could have campaigns builts around these types of characters.

Archetypes and Feats: The archetypes for the kineticist are interesting with the Elemental Aescetic (monk-like kineticist), Kinetic Chirurgeon (healing kineticist) and Overwhelming Soul (replaces constitution with charisma as the kineticist’s key ability) leading the way. The Overwhelming Soul will definitely see the most play since so many of the races that players enjoy have charisma bonuses.

As for feats, notable ones includes Parting Blast, giving a character a heroic, self-sacrificing death, and Delay Blast, sort of a I’m-over-here-but-I-hit-you-from-over-there trick.

4 out of 5 Rating: The concerns from the playtest (one-trick pony) are still there and even with feats and archetypes available, it just does not bump it up to a five.

Medium – Playtest Review

Quick Description: “By contacting spirits in places of power, the medium allows the personalities of legendary heroes to overcome his own, vastly changing his abilities and spells. He holds seances to benefit himself and his allies.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: This class was almost totally rebuilt. It is less confusing and much more interesting. Like in the playtest, the medium is very versatile and can take on any role with little preparation, but the spirits are much simpler. The medium channels entities not from the alignment axis (good/neutral/evil/chaotic/lawful) but from legendary spirits from the Astral Plane. The bonuses a medium receives from the spirits are thematically on point and the versatility is unparalleled. Even spell progression improves when certain spirits are selectd. The only confusion with this class may come from the influences and taboos that each spirit impart on the medium.

Archetypes and Feats: The archetypes of the medium are some of the best out of the entire book with all of them actually being used by someone. The Kami Medium gives an oriental flare to the class while the Spirit Dancer lends a Varisian (or gypsy) theme to the medium. Only the Spirit Focus is noteworthy; it adds +1 to the spirit bonus for a specific type of spirit.

4 out of 5 Rating: This is a complete turn around from the playtest. This version is so much simpler, yet versatile. This was a huge improvement and a great find in this book!

Mesmerist – Playtest Review

Quick Description: ” A mesmerist’s piercing stare lets him insinuate himself into other people’s minds. A master of enchanement and illusion, the mesmerist controls and influences the behavior of others.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: Still the consummate ‘face’ of the party, the mesmerist excels in this role. Still able to stare down its enemies and implant ‘tricks’ into party members, granting them protections and abilities. The mesmerists stare abilities are impressive, but lacking. There is some versatility where the mesmerist provides temporary hit points as healing, but when dealing with something without a mind, he is useless. At that point he must rely on ‘tricks’ to boost himself or party members and just try to survive. On the plus side, the mesmerist does have the capability to get Improved and Greater Feint without the Combat Expertise and intelligence score of 13 prerequisite. Mesmerists are tricky guys and gals.

Archetypes and Feats: The only two archetypes meaningful to the mesmerist are the Spirit Walker (who can actually affect the minds of the mind-less undead) and the Vexing Daredevil (a combat feinting mesmerist). Feats that work for the mesmerist include those that give more ‘tricks’ per day or add more effects onto their stares.

3 out of 5 Rating: This class is lackluster. Even from the playtest, the mesmerist had problems and they were not addressed fully. Players will have to find alternative ways to deal with ‘mindless’ problems.

Occultist – Playtest Review

Quick Description: “To make use of his powers, an occultist channels psychic energy into a varied collection of antiques and mementos with storied pasts. Every type of implement allows him to use a different school of magic.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: Was a fan of this class already, now even more. The spell lists were fleshed out and implements available for use were expanded. Other changes include being able to use mental focus without being afraid of losing power in an implement. During the playtest, players would not use mental focus because, when empty, it would cease functionality. Now the focus is placed and keeps the charge even if you use the mental focus to power other abilities. The only real problem now will be action economy. Using standard actions to activate abilities (like legendary weapon or aegis) take time from combat and keep them out of the fight a little longer.

Archetypes and Feats: Occultist archetypes and feats are actually the most lackluster element of the class. Honestly, they do not add much to the dynamics of the class. The best is Battle Host because it makes an excellent combatant and only one implement is needed, but the problem is that it is a masterwork weapon/armor/shield. You get this item for free at first level and youcan upgrade it as need be. Masterwork fullplate at level one, anyone? Granted you are stuck with it permanently, but still.

5 out of 5 Rating: The occultist wins. It does pretty much everything from the playtest and more. It has the versatility and the power to effect the outcome of any situation, even with action economy being low.

Psychic – Playtest Review

Quick Description: “With her incredibly potent mind, the psychic can cast spells that are more powerful than those members of any other occult class. She accesses these spells though a specific discipline, and can bend and amplify psychic spells as she casts them.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: The psychic has arrived! Pure psychic power is on the table and it tastes good. The final product is excellent. The spells are there and there are more disciplines. Once you master how psychic magic works (undercasting and such), this is probably the most powerful class in this book. Just make sure you choose the ‘Will of the Dead’ phrenic amplification as soon as possible so that you can affect mindless undead with mind-affecting spells.

Archetypes and Feats: Unfortunately, the archetypes do not do this class justice. Period. With the different spells and disciplines, they are not really needed. The different psychic and chakra feats are very, very interesting, but that is another article entirely.

4 out of 5 Rating: This class came a long way from the bare-bones playtest version. It is so much better, but something there is still lacking. It just just cannot get to five yet.

Spiritualist – Playtest Review

Quick Description: “Attuned to the spirits of the dead, a spiritualist forms a bond with a phantom – a returned spirit that has unfinished business but did not become undead. This spectral ally can alternate between forms, emerging from the safety of the spiritualist’s mind to take on an incorporeal form or an ectoplasmic body.” – Occult Adventures, page 10

Final Changes: There are so many similarities between the playtest and final versions of the spiritualist that it may as well be the same. The class has many of the same capabilities as before and could have been released on its own not as a playtest. More spells and phantom emotional foci have completely rounded out this class and it is now one of the best in the book. Expect to see level dips in this class, especially for the Dedication focus. While in the spiritualist’s consciousness, the phantom grants Skill Focus to Diplomacy and Sense Motive and Iron Will to the master. A single dip right there is a total of 10 skill points, +2 to Fortitude save and +4 to Will saves. And you have a sometimes-incorporeal creature that can run errands for you (scout, etc.). GMs will have their hands full with this class. It can definitely take over a game and utterly break it.

Archetypes and Feats: Sad to say that the archetypes are not super-exciting, but the Onmyoji does stand out for flavor (oriental) and spellcasting (divine instead of psychic). Feats are very close to the same feats that are available to summoners.

4 out of 5 Rating: Care has been given to this class and it is very well done. Power creep is the only problem that I see slowing rearing its ugly head.

Other Class Archetypes

Included in Occult Adventures are archetypes, cavalier orders, bloodlines and patrons for the other established classes. There are several very interesting ones to note: Promethean Alchemist (alchemist that brings a homunculus to life), Ghost Rider (cavalier with a spectral mount), Esoteric (tattooed magus monks), Mindblade (magus that forms weapons from psychic energy) and the Psychic Sorcerer Bloodline. Some of these archetypes and bloodlines convert to psychic magic. Remember that characters use thought and emotion instead of verbal and somantic components and there are inherent advantages to this magic (cast while grappled, etc.).

Stay tuned for tomorrow when a group of Occult Adventures playable characters appear. This time they aren’t dwarves…

2015 ENnies – Year of the Dragon

August 5, 2015 Comments off

2015’s Gen Con En World RPG Awards, or “ENnies”, should really be called the “Year of the Dragon”. Wizards of the Coast’s Dungeons and Dragons Fifth Edition product line won 13 Gold and 2 Silver ENnies (out of 23 available). Of those Gold ENnies, they won the prestigious Fan’s Choice for Best Publisher and Product of the Year for the D&D Player’s Handbook. WizKids also picked up two Gold ENnies for their D&D related miniature products. The Dungeons & Dragons products line dominated the RPG world this past year and the awards show that players really liked what they got. It looks like D&D is back on track to become a force in the RPG world once again.

Last year saw Monte Cook Games versus Paizo, Inc., battling it out for RPG domination. This year Monte Cook Games won a Gold and 3 Silver ENnies while Paizo, Inc. won 3 Silver ENnies, with one being Fan’s Choice for Best Publisher. With Wizards of the Coast releasing their products at a brisk pace this last year, MCG and Paizo were simply overrun by sheer numbers. It will be interesting to see what next year holds between the three. What products will MCG or Paizo deliver that will push them over the top and dethrone Wizards from their 2015 throne? We’ll have to see.

Other notable ENnie awards were Best Software won by roll20 for the third year in a row with Lone Wolf Development’s HeroLab and Realms Works taking Silver for two of those years. Another big winner this year was Lamentations of the Flame Princess’ A Red & Pleasant Land. This hardcover won two Golds (Best Writing, Best Setting) and two Silvers (Best Adventure, Product of the Year) and gets praise for its versatility, setting and the art; definitively a book to check out.

Well, until next year!

Categories: 5e, Cons, DnD, News, WOTC

Exploding Kittens: A Meow-entous Card Game

August 5, 2015 Comments off

exploding_kittensIf you were one of over 219,000 backers from Kickstarter, you should have received your Exploding Kittens deck from Elan Lee and The Oatmeal. If you haven’t, you need to have a serious talk with your postal carrier. But don’t threaten them, that’s like a crime or something… I think.

First off, this game is hilarious. The cards are so funny and if you have the NSFW deck, you may not even be able to play because you laughed so hard you peed in your pants. Yes, this almost happened. And make sure you keep the decks separated. It could cause some awkward moments between you and your kids, you and your neighbors or you and your mother-in-law.

Setting up the deck for a group takes less than two minutes and then you are ready. Play is fast and furious and it can be as quick as five minutes depending on where a kitten shows up. The hardest aspect of the game that we found was that, unlike many other card games, you drew from the deck at the END of your turn. Don’t forget that.

We only played three hands and we were already using strategy to screw with each other. We were using Nope cards to negate the cards of each other (including other Nope cards) and using See The Future cards to dictate what Skip (immediately ends your turn), Attack (next player must take 2 turns in a row), or Shuffle cards we needed to play. When you use a Defuse card to negate the Exploding Kitten card, you are allowed to place that kitten back in the deck wherever you choose. That could even mean the top of the deck! In our last hand of the night with only two cards left in the deck and not knowing what the other player had, it was highly stressful and… I lost that hand… to my wife. She laughed.

I give this game an A+. It’s fun, funny and funky and not something you’ve played before. You can play it with the kids or go ‘adult’ with the NSFW add-on. Everyone will have fun playing. If they don’t, you need to have a serious talk with them. But don’t threaten them, that’s like a crime or something…

Have you been able to play yet? And did you have trouble retaining bladder control? Don’t lie!

#ExplodingKittens

Categories: Card, kickstarter, News, Reviews

Force and Destiny Review

August 3, 2015 Comments off

swf02_book_leftThe circle is now complete. When I left you I was but the learner. Now I am the master” – Darth Vader

With the final core book released, Fantasy Flight Games has completed the last major chapter of a truly innovative and dynamic role playing game that captures the feel of the movies. Force and Destiny is the book that deals with the Jedi part of the universe. The first in the series is Edge of the Empire that deals with the underworld or frontier characters, from explorers, to colonists, bounty hunters and smugglers. The next major release focused on military careers and the central struggle between the rebels and the empire in Age of Rebellion. This most recent book focuses on rebuilding the Jedi, and the temptations of the dark side.

While scoundrels in Edge normally have obligations (usually to gangsters, but possibly something more innocuous like family), and rebels in Age have a specific duty to the rebellion in Age, force-sensitive PCs in Force and Destiny have a morality mechanic. It is a 100 point scale, and all PCs generally start at 50. If a force user drops below 30, they have fallen to the dark side. If they rise above 70, they become a light-side paragon. This morality mechanic is the most compelling of the obligation-like mechanics in any of the 3 systems. PCs have the opportunity to gain conflict points throughout a session.

swf02-cliffrunnerOne of the easiest ways to accrue conflict is tapping in to the dark side of the force by using dark pips that come up on the force die to power force powers. When using a force power, PCs roll the white 12-sided die that has both dark and light pips on the faces. Seven of the sides have dark side pips, five of them have white. When a PC declares they are using a force power and dark pips come up, they can spend a destiny point, and gain as many conflict points as dark pips that they use for their powers. Beyond just easy power, morality scores can be triggered by the PCs actions (or inaction!) which can introduce some truly compelling choices. In a time when Jedi are hunted to the edge of the galaxy, PCs need to be careful who sees them use their powers. To make this system really shine, think about a situation in which the wrong person has identified a PC as a Jedi: how does that PC keep that person quiet? Coercion? Murder? This is the quick path to the dark side. There is even a handy table 9-2 on pg. 324 which provides potential conflict points to bestow if Jedi’s abuse their power, or do nothing to stop terrible acts. Surprisingly, this extremely useful table is *not* on the GM’s screen for Force and Destiny.

The path to redemption is a bit random for my taste. At the end of each session, each Force PC rolls a d10. If the number is less than conflict earned that session, they slip closer to the dark side by the difference. If the number is higher, they adjust their morality score closer to the light. I think there should be a second table of redemption point bonuses. Saving bystanders, or showing kindness and wisdom in resolving disputes between NPCs could cancel out a set number of conflict points. Rolling a d10 seems a bit too random to me, and what does it represent?

swf02_atarusideimageDespite that, the morality system is my favorite out of obligation, duty and morality. The book also provides suggestions for using all 3 if you have a group of characters from each book, or even using all 3 for each character if they have multi-classed into several careers. Speaking of careers: those included in Force and Destiny are well done. They borrowed several from options in Knights of the Old Republic: The Consular, the Guardian, and the Sentinel. Beyond the KotOR careers are the Mystic, the Seeker, and the Warrior. Each have three specializations, most of them include one specialization that is a certain lightsaber fighting style, often using a different characteristic other than brawn for those checks. This allows for lightsaber duels based on intellect or willpower and each has signature talents associated with them that may focus on offense, defense, or stealth.

The force powers detailed in this book had some unexpected surprises. Included is Battle Meditation (again from KotOR) which allows your allies to be more effective in battle. Mechanically, this means adding an automatic success to combat checks. The dark side of this power dominates the minds of your allies and enslaves them to your will. Bind allows you to hold up your enemies, and immobilize them. The dark side of which does damage to the target (force choke!). Enhance allows you to add successes to certain skills and force jump. No real dark side to this one. Forsee allows you to get vague hints of the future, and as it progresses can modify your initiative checks. Heal/Harm is pretty obvious, but once you gain mastery of this, you can restore someone to life or straight murder someone to restore life to someone else. The two sides of the majority of the powers provide a lot of variety.

jedi-clump2The included races are some of the best, and represent some of the more iconic Jedi from the movies and cartoons. The only repeats are humans and Twi’lek. Beyond that we have Cereans (cone-head like guys), Kel Dor (my favorite, Master Plo Koon!), Mirialan (Luminara!), Nautolan (My other favorite Kit Fisto!), Togruta (Shaak Ti, Ahsoka Tano), and Zabrak (Darth Maul, Savage Opress). The flavor text and background is outstanding on all. Much like the other books, Force and Destiny also has an outstanding Galaxy chapter that details locations significant to Jedi, and possible adventure seeds in every region of space. It also has a very detailed history section, which it is careful to preface as “legends” as the official timeline has thrown out a lot of what was considered EU or Expanded Universe Star Wars material that was released in the 90s and early 2000s. Also, the adventure included with the Game Master’s screen is intended to be a continuation or run just following the adventure at the end of the book. While each previous screen included an adventure, they were never directly related to each other in Edge or Age.

swf02_betterpartofvalorIn each game, once you gathered a party, you would generally have one large resource to be shared by the party. In Edge, this was generally a light freighter like the Millennium Falcon. In Age, you could have one medium ship, a squadron of fighters, or possibly a base or stronghold. In Force and Destiny, there are some compelling options. You can choose to start with a holocron that allows you two skills to become career skills, as well as offer guidance and possibly teach force powers (as PCs mechanically spend XP). You can also choose to have a mentor who can make force powers easier to learn, or choose a G-9 Rigger, which looks just like Anakin’s ship in early clone wars seasons.

On it’s own, this would be a really fun game. The careers and specializations are diverse enough to create a balanced party of force-sensitive PCs. The adventure seeds of discovering lost Jedi and Sith temples and gathering parts to assemble a lightsaber alone would offer several awesome nights of adventuring. Combined with Edge of the Empire and Age of Rebellion, you can design any possible archetype from the Star Wars universe, and enjoy telling your own awesome tales a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…

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